The sourcing of quality safe retail products at the best market price is the most difficult job in retail. Part II of III

November 13th, 2008

In yesterdays post we closed with the question. Should consumers have anything to worry about and if so what risk does this pose for retailers? Let’s finish up with the consumers view. We’ll discuss the retailer’s risks and concerrns in Part III tomorrow.

In yesterdays post we closed with the question. Should consumers have anything to worry about and if so what risk does this pose for retailers? Let’s finish up with the consumers view. We’ll discuss the retailer’s risks and concerrns in Part III tomorrow.

Over a previously monitored six-month period during 2007 – 2008, hardly a day went by that some notification or safety alert did not appear in the local or national news. Unfortunately as in most news reporting, these reports are often after the fact. Some examples are:

• Outbreaks prompt scrutiny of food labeling
• FDA fees eyed to boost safety
• Meat plant concerns raised for years
• One million baby seats recalled
• China making progress on safety
• Some pet foods Still not on shelves
• Altered Heparin linked to deaths
• Honduran melons linked to salmonella
• Families of U.S. victims sue Chiquita
• Lawsuit follows lead recalls. toymakers, sellers sued in California
• Report: FDA so under funded consumers are put at risk
• Mattel recalls more toys for lead

Okay, let’s sum it up: animal cruelty, illness, increased costs, death and litigation. This is scary stuff. Who has the time to monitor this on a daily basis? We have far more important things to do in our day to day lives such as working, raising our families and enjoying our growing lack off free time. What we don’t have time for, is to worry about the products we buy and the impact they may have on our loved ones, friends, pets or in larger sense the impact of how they are manufactured on our planet. Even worse, is the fact that as our world grows figuratively smaller based on modern technological advances, our global supply chain continues to grow larger, making it even more difficult for the largest of companies to hold their suppliers accountable as to the original source of products or the components and ingredients that make up their finished goods.

The answer is obviously to add more compliance demands on the retail community. In the food sector, an amendment to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act became effective in 2006 called the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act. This act requires food manufacturers to identify in plain, common language the presence of any of the eight major food allergens (soy, shellfish, milk, eggs, peanut, tree nut, wheat, and fish).

Consumer Summary

Consumers do not want to worry about how safe the products they purchase are. Consumers do not wan to pay higher prices or increased taxes to support increases in regulatory compliance. Consumers do not want to invest their precious time in unnecessary litigation. Consumers want retailers and suppliers to collaborate with the most current tools available to insure their safety and that of the environment.

Tomorrow a retailer’s view.

As always we look forward to your input.

If you thought this page is useful to your friend, use this form to send.
Friend Email
Enter your message

Leave a Reply