What is GATT? The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.

August 18th, 2009

Make sure you understand all of the terms associated with off shore sourcing before you jump in. Sourcing products from off shore markets requires careful consideration of literally dozens of shipping terms and conditions.

Make sure you understand all of the terms associated with off shore sourcing before you jump in. Sourcing products from off shore markets requires careful consideration of literally dozens of shipping terms and conditions.

As companies grow, the allure of sourcing lower cost products from off shore markets looks attractive. Mistakes in understanding the complex import/expert terms and conditions can cost you money, time or both.

Many safeguards are in place to insure that unnecessary damages do not occur to the local markets or workforces as a result of product imports.

The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) permits two forms of multilateral safeguards: (a) a country’s right to impose temporary import controls or other trade restrictions to prevent commercial injury to domestic industry, and (b) the corresponding right of exporters not to be deprived arbitrarily of access to markets. Article XIX of the GATT permits a country whose domestic industries or workers are adversely affected by increased imports to withdraw or modify concessions the country had earlier granted, to impose, for a limited period, new import restrictions if the country can establish that a product is “being imported in such increased quantities as to cause or threaten serious injury to domestic producers,” and to keep such restrictions in effect for a such time as may be necessary to prevent or remedy such injury.

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