Archive for June, 2013

Is your company comfortable with all of your current sources of supply?

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

If your answer is yes, there is a good chance that you are paying more for products, services and solution bundles than you should

Being comfortable is great. Sometimes however being to comfortable can also create complacency. We all know we have coworkers that come to work everyday and do what only what they perceive their job to be. Nothing extra is ever done, and few ideas come from these folks that are just comfortable with what they are doing and how they are doing it. They do a good job at it, but that’s it.

Let’s apply this type of complacency to knowledge workers in the supply chain. If we are being honest with ourselves; we see this situation all the time.

 A buyer you know has a list of products or a category manager has a category that they are responsible for. There are only so many hours in the day and they have a job to do in order to get product to a distribution center, warehouse, store or some other location on time. They have done business with the same suppliers for a number of years. In fact the person in the job before them did business with these same suppliers and the person before that. So its easy to not rock the boat. It takes to much time to look for new sources of supply and after all one can only manage so many relationships anyway. Finally the buyer is comfortable with product quality and pricing has not gone up to much over time.

With the help of your procurement provider, this situation is easily rectified, but you need to be open to change. This is normally led from the top of the organization. The following is a partial list of what you can do to eliminate complacency and support the fact that you knowledge workers don’t have a lot of free time.

 1.   Provide your e-procurement company with a list of your suppliers by category.
 2.   Provide your e-procurement provider with a complete list of products carried by each supplier.
 3.   As your e-procurement provider to produce a list of new sources of supply located within a fifty mile radius of each distribution center or warehouse
 4.   Ask your e-procurement provider to provide data on each supplier’s including incumbent’s safety certifications such as GFSI and ISO.
 5.   Ask your e-procurement provider to provide supplier background information such as years in business and user references.
 6.   Select categories or products to source from your incumbents catalog and cross reference with new suppliers offerings.

The additional steps to this process can be provided by SafeSourcing as a part of our best practices deliverables which are included in our event pricing. The SafeSourceIt™ Supplier database includes over 427,000 global sources of supply that can be sorted by a variety of filters such as country, county, postal code or mileage from a particular location, plus many more.

If you’d like more information, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Services Account Manager!

We look forward to and appreciate your comments

 

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What is an RFI, RFP, or RFQ? Part VI of VI

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Today’s post is by Heather Powell, Project Manager for SafeSourcing

As we wrap up this 6-part series on RFx strategies, looking specifically at RFQs the past two days, we will take a look at some strategies that successfully increase the two most important aspects of every project you run; value results, supplier participation.   The two are separate but both must be achieved to truly create a successful project.

Today we will focus on how to drive supplier participation in your events.

Details, Details, Details- In the RFQ, send an invitation to potential suppliers containing in a detailed list or description of all relevant parameters of the intended purchase, such as:

• Personnel skills, training level or competencies
• Part descriptions/specifications or numbers
• Quantities/Volumes
• Description or drawings
• Quality levels
• Delivery requirements
• Term of contract
• Terms and conditions
• Other value added requirements or terms
• Draft contract

By breaking the mold, you can typically have 8-10 suppliers or more participate in your project. They are all actively participating within the RFQ in a set timeframe, which is usually 15 minutes, but can be adjusted with a line item count of over 25 items.  Within the 15 minutes, suppliers can lower their bid pricing an unlimited amount of times. Like sealed bidding, suppliers cannot see one another’s pricing. There is only one way they know they have a low quote on an items and that is by a low quote indicator. 

Missing Pieces- An easy way to establish your specifications and already have base pricing is from your RFP! Many times you already have a list of suppliers that are educated on entering pricing within the system. The RFQ gives the supplier the opportunity within the live event to see if they have any low quotes and to “sharpen their pencils” to lower their pricing if they wish. From this event you can potentially award a business based on the pricing, or offer another supplier you may feel fit your business better the opportunity to negotiate their pricing closer to what the lowest bidder provided. This is a win-win for you and the future supplier.

Training and Communication – Suppliers should be trained on how to use the eProcurement system, how to place their bids, to look for the low quote indicator, and at the same time communicated with on questions and the pricing and products and services you are looking for. The overall goal is to get the best value for your company, and so suppliers should have an opportunity to enter in notes within the RFQ live event. This additional information can offer you even more additional savings, i.e. if you purchase 1,000 cases rather than 900, additional discounts, or other value added services such as waived for the first 6 months of a 1 year contract if awarded the business. These additional notes can provide and overall benefit, rather than just a low price wins.

If we go back to our original example of owning a building you would like to turn into a distribution center, we have discussed an RFI to understand what your needs could be, an RFP to collect further information and pricing proposal, and an RFQ to compress than pricing from the list of supplier who participated in the RFP.  It would be recommended in this last stage to run your line items as a complete list of materials rather than an item by item list, total cost of freight, total installation pricing- which could include teardown pricing or to have it as its own line item. These four items represent the largest spend items of your proposal and have the opportunity to lower your pricing 5, 10, 15, or even 20% from the original RFP pricing.

Determining what stage of the RFx process to begin with and how to assemble those pieces can be a difficult puzzle to put together especially if your procurement team is already swamped. A good Stratgeic Sourcing partner, however should be able to help you put these pieces together in a way that requires less time and resources from your procurement department than doing it yourself.   For more information on how we can help you with this process from gathering external and internal data to running RFIs, RFPs and RFQs or for more information on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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What is an RFI, RFP, or RFQ? Part V of VI

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Today’s post is by Heather Powell, Project Manager for SafeSourcing

You have read a lot of information on how to create a successful RFI and RFP.  In today’s blog we take you through the Request for Quote and the best way to build the best, quickest, and most successful RFQ.

An RFQ as  defined by www.businessdictionary.com  is “a document used in soliciting price and delivery quotations that meet minimum quality specifications for a specific quantity of specific goods and/or services. RFQ are usually not advertised publicly, and are used commonly for (1) standard, off-the-shelf items, (2) items built to known specifications, (3) items required in small quantities, or (4) items whose purchase price falls below sealed-bidding threshold. Suppliers respond to a RFQ with firm quotations, and generally the lowest-priced quotation is awarded the contract.”

Though this is the industry standard of what an RFQ means, today we will be digging into each of these to validate their merit. We will expand upon them, heighten them, and discuss how to expect increased value within an RFQ. With online eProcurement tools you can give suppliers an indicator of where they stand and give them an opportunity to lower their pricing should they choose. In standard practice this is done by phone calls or e-mails and one at time. It is very time consuming and does show some lower savings, but not with the rate of success online tools can provide.

Let’s take a closer look at the points to the definition above.

Standard, off-the-shelf items. This is a standard misconception of procurement departments everywhere.  The fact is that virtually any product or service can be taken through the eRFx process.  We have over 427,000 suppliers within our database to invite to participate in bidding on whatever your items or service may be and we have experience successfully running events in every part of the organization from HR, to Legal, to construction, to IT.

Items built to known specifications. While this is a valid point, it is also the biggest reason why projects are never taken out; no beginning specifications.  At SafeSourcing we help build a specification to fit the current need and in those in the future. By covering all of your needs and taking into consideration all of the moving parts that affect your items, for example, freight, fuel surcharges, additional fees, hourly rates to name a few, you can achieve results that are comprehensive enough to allow you to make strong decisions well after the project has been completed.

Items required in small quantities. There are no limits to quantities within the RFQ we help you build. There are no limits at all, including number of items to have the suppliers bid on. That being said there are always strategies that go with every event so that you end up with the most information you can get while allowing suppliers to focus on those areas you are most concerned with.   This is part of the service that you should be taking time to consider as you develop your sourcing projects.

Items whose purchase price falls below sealed-bidding threshold. The pricing we recommend within your RFQ would be analyzed by our team based on your historical spend, also taking into account any price indexes that can affect future pricing increases. Using your historical spend and any additional information, a max quote is established that the suppliers must meet first. We recommend a set price decrement, meaning once a supplier inputs their pricing at the max quote or lower, they must lower their pricing by that decrement amount, already showing lower pricing than what you currently are paying or price avoidance of future price increases. This is the start to showing you savings.

Knowing the differences between historical RFQ strategies and changes that are resulting in stronger results is the beginning of assembling the right structure for your project.  Tomorrow we will discuss, practically, how this is accomplished.

For more information on how we can help you with your procurement needs or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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What is an RFI, RFP, or RFQ? Part IV of VI

Monday, June 24th, 2013

Today’s post is by Heather Powell, Project Manager for SafeSourcing

Today, we wrap of the review of the Request For Proposal stage of the RFX process looking at a view of how to transition the information you get from an RFI into an RFP.

In our example within the RFI, owning a new or used facility to turn into a distribution center, you may know where you want the racking, how much racking is required-this would include a set materials listing, the details of labor to install new materials and remove and re-rack another area. All of these details are required for the suppliers to bid the job appropriately. Within a very detailed RFP there are fewer chances for over or under bidding from the suppliers. The quality of an RFP is very important to successful project management because it clearly delineates the deliverables that will be required.

The details you receive from a RFI can be used to build your specifications. You have learned and verified from multiple suppliers the details you need to complete the project. You may also learn from an RFI details you hadn’t thought about, for instance in the racking project: if you are in California you will be required to have a seismic analysis done. This can be completed, but for an additional charge from the supplier. Suppliers may have similar products, but may not be compatible to other supplier’s materials, in other words their product will be proprietary and not interchangeable if a repair needs made in the future. These details and more need to be inserted into your new RFP.

So how can you combine a RFI with a RFP? Simply you have a lot of knowledge about a product, project, or service, but you have used the same supplier for a very long time and are unclear of who new potential suppliers could be. You would combine the RFI by asking the questions specifically related to the new potential suppliers; who are they, where are they located, what is their business structure, who the contacts are, what areas or locations can they service, what are their references, etc.  Combined with the specifications and details of the RFP, you will get an overall picture of who the company is, what they can or cannot provide, and what their pricing structure will be.

Now you have an idea of how to collect information on a project you may know little about within a RFI and you now know how to collect a RFP with the information you do know, but do you know how to compress pricing? How do you receive pricing within a RFP and ask the suppliers to lower their pricing? Stay tuned to the next part in this blog series where dive into the controversial Request for Quote, how it can be more than just a low-price only tool.

SafeSourcing can help you with your needs in creating, running, and reporting on a RFP for any item, project, or industry need. We can do this all electronically in your set timeline, and report it back to you in an easy and understandable package where you will be able to see the apples-to-apples comparison. For more information on how we can help you with your procurement needs or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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What is an RFI, RFP, or RFQ? Part III of VI

Friday, June 21st, 2013

Today’s post is by Heather Powell, Customer Services Manager at SafeSourcing Inc.

We will continue to look at those details; wrapping up tomorrow with a view of how to transition the information you get from an RFI to an RFP.

Schedules or Timelines: This is the time frame of the expectation of when the RFP is sent to the vendors, when questions (about the specifications or the RFP process) are due from the vendors, when the vendors can expect the questions with answers to be return, when the RFP is due to be complete.

Contract Type: This defines to the vendor if the contract is a spot buy, a one year, two year, or longer contract. There may be additional special contractual requirements added within this area. 

Data Requirements: This can vary from the type of RFP you many want to run, but every RFP should collect basic information about the vendors, their name, address, primary business, who the primary contact with their information, usually a list of 3-5 references, a list of current businesses that are similar in size to the company running the RFP.

Terms and Conditions: General and special arrangements, provisions, requirements, rules, specifications, and standards that form an integral part of an agreement or contract.

Description of Goods and/or Services to Be Procured:  This is to define what you are looking specifically to buy. It is a tie in between your scope of work and your specifications. This area is typically where you are going to ask the vendor to give their proposal of price based on your needs defined and within the guidelines of the specifications.

Instructions for preparation of technical, management, and/or cost proposals: These are the details on how to complete the RFP. If online through SafeSourcing, you will be given a deadline to complete the RFP, trained on how to enter your RFP and Pricing, and the additional information the customer may need as supplemental documentation and how to submit that information. In a sealed bid, you will be given specific instructions on what documents need to be signed and returned, what additional information needs to be submitted and the expectations on how to submit it, and specifically how to mail it into the government agency that will review it by a set date and time.

SafeSourcing can help you with your needs in creating, running, and reporting on a RFP for any item, project, or industry need. Tomorrow we will wrap up the series by looking at the path of information from the RFI to RFP and how to use that information to make the best decisions. For more information on how we can help you with your procurement needs or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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What is an RFI, RFP, or RFQ? Part II of VI

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Today’s post is by Heather Powell, Customer Services at Manager for SafeSourcing Inc.

In yesterday’s post, we began to look at the RFx strategy by starting with Requests For Information and their purpose in the procurement world.  Over the next three days we will focus on Requests for Proposal and the details you need to run a successful one.

According to businessdictionary.com,a Request for Proposal (RPF) is a document used in sealed or electronic bid procurement procedures through which a purchaser advises the potential suppliers of (1) statement and scope of work, (2) specifications, (3) schedules or timelines, (4) contract type, (5) data requirements, (6) terms and conditions, (7) description of goods and/or services to be procured, and (8) instructions for preparation of technical, management, and/or cost proposals.  Government RFPs are publicly advertised and suppliers respond with a detailed proposal, not with only a price quotation. They provide clearly quoted specifications for negotiations after sealed proposals are opened, and the award of contract may not necessarily go to the lowest bidder.”

Those are the basics that make up a RFP, but how do you know what is important in each step?  Today we will focus on the first two pieces and the other 6 in tomorrow’s blog.

Scope of Work:  Businessdictionary.com states, “the division of work to be performed under a contract or subcontract in the completion of a project, typically broken out into specific tasks with deadlines.” Simply this means what are your needs and expectations for the work needing to be completed.

Specifications: “An exact statement of the particular needs to be satisfied, or essential characteristics that a customer requires (in a good, material, method, process, service, system, or work) and which a vendor must deliver. Specifications are written usually in a manner that enables both parties (and/or an independent certifier) to measure the degree of conformance. They are, however, not the same as control limits (which allow fluctuations within a range), and conformance to them does not necessarily mean quality (which is a predictable degree of dependability and uniformity).”

Generally specifications will be broken into either performance or technical specifications that define the types of goods or services needed from the vendor community.  Developing strong specifications is to ensure you receive a proposal with exactly what you need. The vendors will know not to over bid or under bid.

As we continue the rest of this week in this series, remember that SafeSourcing can help you with your needs in creating, running, and reporting on a RFP for any item, project, or industry need. For more information on how we can help you with your procurement needs or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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Dad Wasn’t Wrong About Too Much!

Monday, June 17th, 2013

Today’s post is by Mark Davis; Sr. Vice President and COO at SafeSourcing.
For many more reasons than I could possibly go into in this short blog, this Father’s Day has been a very special one for me.  I have so many reasons to celebrate as I watch the U.S. Open and spend spectacular time with my family and my dad via Skype (how times have changed!).  As I reflect on this day it makes me think of all the advice that fathers, mine and millions of others, have given their children over the years and how simple the ideas are and yet at the same time how powerfully applicable to the business world we all live in every day.

In today’s post I want to go back to some of that advice and see how much value still stands in concepts that are so simple.

Treat people as you expect to be treated – The procurement space can be brutal.  Suppliers are trying to deliver value and make money; customers are trying to get as much value as possible while controlling costs.  These two things can often create clashes and tension as both sides work to get the things they want out of a business relationship.  The key that comes here is to remember that the same suppliers you are beating up on price will be the same ones you are asking for rush service and special assistance on down the road.  Creating partnerships with the best value and cost is the goal.  Everyone is a supplier and everyone is a customer at some level and applying this simple advice can help forge the greatest value for your company.

When you know you are right it’s ok to stand your ground – The process of procuring goods is not a new one, in fact evidence of tracking supplies and services dates back as far as ancient Egypt as scribes would record orders taken and those fulfilled on papyrus rolls.  With such a long history it is no wonder that certain ideas and processes have developed that continue to show up even today.  As the world changes, and tools change, processes change, and capabilities improve, this fatherly advice has never been so applicable.  Many misconceptions from the past about how to source goods, what could and couldn’t be sourced and how to deal with vendors have evolved into new possibilities.  Knowing your category, industry and vendors is the foundation to build your projects on.  Sometimes these projects will go against normal approaches but if you have done your homework and believe your strategy is sound, stand your ground and fight for what you believe is best for your company even if your suppliers or internal customers grumble about the change.

Plan your work; work your plan –  I have heard this advice over the years from many people I have admired and respected.  It is simple and encompasses everything that best sourcing projects need in two pieces.  1.  Plan the work (create the project); this involves research and a knowledge of what you are going after that goes beyond a 15 minute Google search.  It means researching the market, indexes, new technologies and trends, new suppliers and new government regulations that may affect your goals.   Knowing your category allows you to plan the work with measureable milestones teams can follow and be a part of.  2.  Work the Plan you have created with little exception.  Once you have created the plan for the project, stick to the timelines and employ leverage where you need it to keep projects moving.  Everyone is always going to be overloaded with work, so if you are not the one working your plan every day you will be replaced in our people’s priorities by someone else who is.

Don’t spit in the wind and don’t take any wooden nickels –  I will be honest, I have no frame of reference by which to link these sage pieces of advice back to the world of procurement, but they both always seemed like really good ideas.

We, at SafeSourcing, hope your Father’s Day was full of great memories and happy times!  We enjoy bringing this blog to you every week and hope you find value in it.   For more information on how we can help you with your procurement needs or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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Does your company buy name brand printer ink?

Friday, June 14th, 2013

Today’s post is from Sarah Kouse a project manager at SafeSourcing.

If you are buying name brand ink (HP, Epson, Canon, etc.) for your printer when you run out, you may be spending a significant more than if you were to purchase an “off-brand” or remanufactured printer ink.

Remanufactured printer ink looks the same, prints the same, and even has the same quality, but could potentially save your company a significant amount of money if you switched from the name brand ink, and if your spend is large enough it might event get your current supplier to lower your name brand product in order to keep your business. This of course depends which product they make the most margin on.

By way of a recent example, a black ink cartridge for an HP Officejet printer that goes for around $40, you could get a combo pack set of remanufactured ink, including all of the colors (Black, Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow) for around $30. That’s about $7.50 per cartridge and 25% below your current price. If you were buying just black ink, you could purchase 5 times the amount of remanufactured black ink for the price of one single name brand cartridge. Obviously the results may differ based on volume.

The savings generated by switching to remanufactured ink can be significant, especially based on the amount of printing most companies do.

If you’d like to learn how we can help your reduce your printing costs, contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.

We look forward to and appreciate your comments.

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Suppliers, Toot Your Horn! Customers, Let them! Part II of II

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Today’s post is by Mark Davis; Sr. Vice President and COO at SafeSourcing.

One of the biggest gripes that suppliers have about procurement departments and Strategic Sourcing partners they work with is that they only care about getting the lowest cost and nothing about the value of what they are currently or can bring to the table.  Unfortunately there has been a precedent set by the procurement and “reverse auction” companies that has rightfully created this gripe in many suppliers.

Yesterday we began talking about the VALUE of FREE and how suppliers need to do a better job of tracking this for their customers and reporting on it on a regular basis so that improvements can be seen and, if necessary, changes in process can be made.  As we continue today we will wrap up by touching on a few additional areas suppliers need to keep in mind when working with their customers and the reasons why customers need to encourage their good vendors to do this.

Measure the results – As suppliers/vendors it is your job to keep track of the progress you are making.  Do not assume that your customer is keeping track of the money you may be saving or the on-time delivery or the quality of product or the quick resolution of issues.  It is your duty to ensure that you measure your success with that customer.  Logistics companies: make sure you track the time between order to pickup to delivery.  Service companies: be working on the ever important ROI on the very first day you begin working with your customer.  Manufacturers: track the lead time for every item ordered by your customer and where possible, show where you have improved it.   Never assume that your customers are tracking what you do for them but ALWAYS assume that eventually someone is going to ask what value you are bringing to them to justify your cost.

Track the extra and Toot the Horn –  Right on the heels of tracking your results is making sure you record the little extras you bring to your customers.  Whether you create extra reports, or visit the customer’s site to meet with their team, or you keep your staff over the weekend to assist with a critical issue, record everything and do not ever be afraid to toot your own horn to your customers to remind them of the extra effort they are getting from you.  They may not realize what you have done and in time without you telling them they will come to expect it as part of the package and you will find yourself continuing to do more work for the same price. 

On the flip side, customers tell us all the time that they don’t want procurement involved because their relationships are too important.  Our response it always the same, “Great!  Let us help you quantify what your incumbent is doing for you today so that we can compare that to what the market is doing for other companies.”  Encourage your suppliers to record the extra things they do for you otherwise someone sitting in a very important office somewhere in your company is going to see that Company X is charging you $10 per widget when they know very well from their last job that Company Z only charges $8.  Without documentation of the extras (with some measurable value attached) you will likely find Company Z and their $8 widgets as your new vendor and Company X out the door.

At SafeSourcing we are constantly talking to our suppliers and customers about the importance of value and that while cost cannot be ignored, the overall value is what are trying to pinpoint in the projects we run.  The only way to accurately do that is to understand the “extras” a supplier can bring or is currently bringing to the table and attaching value to that.  Only in this way can a true decision that is best for the customer truly be made.  For more information on how we can help you evaluate your current or future suppliers and the value they can bring you or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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Suppliers, Toot Your Horn! Customers, Let them! Part I of II

Monday, June 10th, 2013

Today’s post is by Mark Davis; Sr. Vice President and COO at SafeSourcing.

One of the biggest gripes that suppliers have about procurement departments and Strategic Sourcing partners they work with is that they only care about getting the lowest cost and nothing about the value of what they are currently or can bring to the table.  Unfortunately there has been a precedent set by the procurement and “reverse auction” companies that has rightfully created this gripe in many suppliers.

Not every strategic sourcing company nor every procurement department sees things like this.  Many want to evaluate everything; the extra services suppliers can bring them, the rush orders at no charge, the extra reporting that is given at 10:00pm on a Friday night, the waived fees, and of course they also want to look at price.  The problem that procurement teams face is that when all they are given by an internal owner or from the suppliers themselves is list of prices and a brochure it makes it very difficult to justify paying 15% more for company A when they appear (through prices and a pamphlet) to offer the same service or product as Company B.

Today’s post is for suppliers and their customers alike because it cuts through the “price is all that matters” conversation to get straight at what matters: value.  Suppliers need to be responsible for proving it and attaching monetary value to it and customers need to put more controls in place to ensure they get it.

The Value of Free – In a  recent post we talked about the cost of FREE.  Today we are talking about the VALUE of FREE.  Every Christmas the newspapers double in size as retailers fight for consumer attention.  When the same exact television is offered by two different retailers for the exact same price a decision must be made and when the consumer sees that one retailer is offering an extended warranty as part of the price the decision becomes easier because there is something free included, but that free has value to the consumer.   Business procurement is no different.  If two companies have the same price for their plastic bags or even if one company is slightly higher but offers to ship directly to your stores and the other will ship just to a distribution center where additional costs to go to the stores are incurred, there is a measureable value to that free service.  What may have been a higher cost for bags is now a lower total cost of ownership because you just dropped your costs to ship the bags to the stores.

At SafeSourcing we are constantly talking to our suppliers and customers about the importance of value and that while cost cannot be ignored, the overall value is what are trying to pinpoint in the projects we run.  The only way to accurately do that is to understand the “extras” a supplier can bring or is currently bringing to the table and attaching value to that.  Only in this way can a true decision that is best for the customer truly be made.  Tomorrow we will take a deeper look into the other ways value can be established.  For more information on how we can help you evaluate your current or future suppliers and the value they can bring you or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please Contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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