Archive for November, 2015

Where does your Thanksgiving turkey come from?

Wednesday, November 25th, 2015

 

Today’s post is written by Heather Powell, Project Manager at SafeSourcing Inc.

For as long as I can remember my family has bought their Thanksgiving turkey from Bowman & Landes Turkey Farm, located in New Carlisle, Ohio. As a family, we have bought from them because they are a local family run farm and business, they are healthy birds, and they are USDA inspected. Those are the things I knew growing up, however further research of their farm has taught me a lot more and makes me and my family all the more proud of this family run business. They have been running antibiotic free, free range, and not fed any animal by-products long before it was considered to be the “in thing” to do.  Please see the information below from their website.

Can you say any of these things about your turkey?

Turkeys have been raised on the Bowman & Landes turkey farm since 1948. We are proud to be in our fourth generation, with three generations actively involved.

The original mission to produce the highest quality free range turkeys’ using the most natural home grown grains has not changed and continues to drive our organization. Our commitment to quality and excellence includes the grain we grow, the turkeys we produce, and the customers we serve.

Nutrition is very important in producing the highest quality turkey possible. Our turkeys are grown antibiotic free and are not fed any animal by-products. We farm 2200 acres and consider ourselves to be good stewards of the land. Where possible, we use turkey compost to fertilize our fields. No till and minimum tillage practices are used in order to save our precious Miami County soil. We harvest and dry our own grain and store it on our farm. Our natural grains, consisting of wheat, corn, and soybeans are ground and mixed on the farm and fed fresh to the turkeys. Bowman & Landes was the proud recipient of the 2007  Ohio Environmental Stewardship award for poultry, and also the Miami County Soil and Water Cooperator of the year for 2006.

Baby turkeys, called poults, are started in climate controlled barns. As the turkeys mature, they are moved to an outdoor range where they are provided with feeders, waterers, and shelters. Heavy duty fencing is used for their protection from predators. Turkeys thrive on the open range, where they have plenty of room to roam in the fresh air and sunshine.

A male turkey, or tom, is raised to market age in 18-20 weeks. A female, or hen, is raised in 14-17 weeks of age. Our turkeys, whether tom or hen, all have the same tenderness, flavor, and texture.

Each turkey is U.S.D.A inspected by a government inspector to help ensure a wholesome product. Our unique feeding program causes Bowman & Landes turkeys to have a natural tenderness, which results in shorter cooking times and excellent flavor. Our turkeys are naturally self-basting and moist without additives.

Bowman & Landes offers fresh whole turkeys and turkey products during the Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter seasons. Whole frozen turkeys, breasts, boneless roasts, and breast fillets are available throughout the year. Fresh cooked turkey breast, smoked turkey breast, turkey ham, and many more products are available year round in our retail store located on our farm, as well as in many quality restaurants and meat markets throughout Ohio. http://www.bowmanlandes.com/ 

Now I am sure my grandparents’ and parents’ could have gone to the local supermarket and bought their turkey for a cheap, cents per pound, but not knowing where those turkeys have come from or how they have been raised just didn’t make them feel comfortable feeding to our family. Sure they paid a little more back then, just as I do today, but I feel pride of buying local, supporting local business and now truly knowing that for years our turkey was raised in the best possible methods makes me feel so my safer and happier serving the best.

By researching your food source is truly the only way you know you are feeding yourself and your family the very best.

We at SafeSourcing wish you and your family the very best and happiest Thanksgivings.

Please feel free to contact us on how SafeSourcing can help you with your eProcurement needs, or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing customer services account manager.

We look forward to and appreciate your comments.

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The importance of business social media

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

 

Today’s post is by Tyler Walther; Account Manager at SafeSourcing.

Your target market usually researches information about companies relevant to them and LinkedIn is a perfect avenue to do so. Creating your personal LinkedIn company page gives more exposure and visibility to your business, products and services. It gives potential clients and connections another touch point for discovery of your business and its offerings.

LinkedIn allows your company page to have followers. Your page followers are able to keep track of your company news, updates, and announcements. This leads to a worthwhile discussion; your company must keep the page updated with new topics, blogs, links to industry articles, and discussion topics. If you have a page that is not updated and never changing, you may as well not have a company LinkedIn page at all!

Company pages have recommendations just like your personal profile. Your satisfied customers can now easily recommend you, your product or your service. Having these recommendations well assist business over your competitors who do not.

Your company’s products and services can be added in your LinkedIn Company page. You can also add videos to each of your product or service listings. This gives you the ability and opportunity to showcase what you can do and what you have to offer, as well as giving a personalized touch to those offerings.

SafeSourcing manages a LinkedIn profile found on LinkedIn as SafeSourcing, Inc. We post blogs authored by employees, links to industry articles and fun, interesting information. Please give us a visit, we appreciate the connection.

 We enjoy bringing this blog to you every week and hope you find value in it. For more information on how we can help you with your procurement needs or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative. We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

 We look forward to your comments. 

 

 

 

 

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Has your company thought about composting in order to reduce waste costs?

Friday, November 20th, 2015

 

Today’s blog has been written by Ryan Melowic Vice President of Customer Services at SafeSourcing.

Composting technologies have come a long way for the commercial kitchen, supermarket, hotel, resort, and commercial food distribution companies.  Currently there are several companies manufacturing equipment that rapidly decompose all food waste into a nutrient-rich liquid suitable for discharge into public waste water disposal systems Initial studies demonstrate that the water discharged may have a positive application for use as a fertilizing agent.  The rising costs of waste collection and disposal make the use of the equipment a sound financial investment.

There are several companies with options for composting equipment thus making it a good candidate for a formal RFP.  SafeSourcing will work with your company to identify the specifications and requirements you have in this category. We will then provide the vendors who can support your company’s footprint. We will then facilitate an RFP to insure that your company receives the best overall value for this equipment and services.

When companies choose to compost food waste there are economic, environmental, community and health and sanitation benefits. It only makes sense for companies to compost food waste.

SafeSourcing does the due diligence to ensure we are familiar with new technologies that can reduce waste costs. Composting is an example of one of the many solutions retailers can implement to reduce costs.  For more information on how SafeSourcing can help you with insuring certified suppliers, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service representative.

We look forward to and appreciate your comments.

 

 

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The Importance of the “UOM”

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

 

Today’s post is by Alyson Usserman, Project Manager at SafeSourcing.

Do you know the importance of the “UOM”?”

Within the procurement industry, every specification boils down to one thing, the Unit of Measure. Without a consistent UOM within the specification when completing an RFP or RFQ, you will receive quotes all over the board that do not match each other or an industry standard.

The issue with having an inconsistent UOM is that you can potentially make the entire event not valid. There are hundreds of UOMs depending on the industry that you are collecting pricing for.  When deciding a UOM to collect pricing, it is typically within the original specifications that the items are based on.

The main concern is that the suppliers need to understand the UOM fully. If they do not, none of the pricing will be consistent. We, at SafeSourcing, make sure that our suppliers know exactly what the UOM is for each event and line item within the event.

For more information on how we can help you with your procurement needs or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

 

 

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Taking the proper time in orderto prepare for your sourcing projects. The story of Ray and John Part V

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

 

Today’s post is from our SafeSourcing archives.

What are you doing to understand the results you are receiving from your projects?

We have spent most of last week looking at Ray and John, two procurement professionals who were running sourcing projects for containerboard for their respective companies.   Ray and John took different approaches to understanding the containerboard market, suppliers, company atmosphere and in determining the goals of the project.  They had each executed their strategies and now needed to understand the results they received. Yesterday we looked at Ray’s results and today we finish our series by looking at the results John was able to achieve.

John works on a small team just like Ray does but long made the commitment to invest a little bit of his every week to try and stay up to date on the markets he deals, the vendors that are in it as well as to understand what is going on in his own company by scheduling periodic meetings with the department heads.  Due to the fact that John had invested this time up front, it made it easier for John to understand initiatives of his company, and trends in the market and with suppliers to form goals that accomplished more in his projects than just reducing price.

The final known metrics that John’s project was able to achieve were as follows:

•  Project Start Date – January 9, 2013
•  Number of Suppliers Involved – 12
•  Percent of spend being review – 100%
•  Amount of time spent doing research to understand project
o  5 hours per week reading industry publications and blogs for the entire year
o  10 hours reviewing current contracts and invoices
o  15 hours spent researching other suppliers
o  4.5 hours preparing survey and analyzing results
o  2 hours per week meeting with other departments to understand what they are doing
o  18 hours negotiating final versions of updated contracts
•  Additional Information Collected – Green Initiatives from Suppliers; Production levels for containerboard; Internal survey detailed division satisfaction levels, usage and the fact that two of his regional players had been acquired by National companies.
•  Amount of time spent communicating with suppliers – 2 hours personally, however his 3rd party strategic sourcing company invested 33 total hours on his company’s behalf to help arrange a price gathering process.
•  Number of Bids and Changes – Average of 47 bids each – 564 total bids/changes collected in 37 minutes.
•  Savings Achieved  – 9% savings plus the average of 8-12% predicted future increases
•  Terms – Net 30 Plus 3% Discount on Net 20 collected from one vendor
•  Contract Length – One year contract with reviews against Indexes every 6 months; Discount of 5% on a two year deal but with the consolidation of vendors John’s company is leaning toward a one year deal and taking it back out in 12 months.
•  Number of additional suppliers supplying outlying divisions
•  Plan is to consolidate the 18 regional and National vendor group down to a Better/Best National program with one Regional  included to help handle on region that represents 45% of his overall spend.
•  Project Complete Date – February 27, 2013 last contract was finalized

John had a goal to achieve “value” for his company and in doing this he had to understand everything about what was going on around him in the industry and in the company.  This understanding allowed him to create a specification and scope that was extremely detailed and accurate for the vendor community.  After reviewing everything the attention to detail was not lost on the vendor community or the seriousness of the opportunity.  John had a plan with clear goals and was able to convey that successfully to the suppliers who showed up with additional discounts and pricing in order to win the business.

When it was all completed John’s year round efforts produced 3 great vendors, one of which was new, discounts for terms and larger orders that would be stored in his new warehouses and competitive pricing while avoiding a cost increase.  His final decision was aligned with the corporate initiatives for “green” and woman-owned companies and reducing his supplier count would save his company hours of additional administrative effort.

You may be like Ray but desperately want to operate like John but without the staff or the time to dedicate at that level.

At SafeSourcing we understand Ray’s frustration and that is why our customer services team works with you to achieve great results while removing much of the work from your plate.  For more information on how we can help you with your sourcing projects, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today

We look forward to your comments.

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Taking the proper time in order to prepare for your sourcing projects. The story of Ray and John Part IV

Tuesday, November 10th, 2015

 

Today’s post is our SafeSourcing archives.

We have spent the better part of the last week following the sourcing activities of Ray and John, two procurement professionals who were running containerboard sourcing projects for their respective companies.   Ray and John took different approaches to understanding the containerboard market, suppliers, company atmosphere and in determining the goals for their projects.  Each executed their strategies and now needed to clearly understand and evaluate their results.

Ray’s strategy was focused on his three big incumbents and in getting them to improve their pricing.  Ray was not prepared to ask or collect much additional information from his vendors nor was he able to properly research the market and his company landscape to learn what was going on that he was unaware of.   Ray was able to garner some limited information relative to his suppliers “green” initiatives and was pleased to learn that all three incumbents were at some level of implementing policies and offerings that were aligned with his company’s new plans as well.

On average Ray was able to achieve locked in savings for 6 months and also avoided the 8-12% increases he had understood would be coming.  Ray was pleased with these results, however, because he had not talked to his finance department in a while he had no idea of their move to requesting Net 45 terms from all suppliers was only a few weeks away from being implemented and that he would have to have a conversation with his suppliers that would have had much more leverage prior to negotiating these new contracts.   Also, because Ray chose to focus on the three big incumbents, the divisions using local suppliers were moving forward with business as usual and much of what Ray was able to save was going to be lost in increases in the outlying divisions.

The final known metrics that Ray’s project was able to achieve were as follows:

1.     Project Start Date

a.      January 7, 2013

2.     Number of Suppliers Involved

a.      3

3.     Percent of spend being reviewed

a.      60%

4.     Amount of time spent doing research to in order to understand  the project

hours per week reading industry publications and blogs

a.      7.5 hours reviewing current contracts and invoices

b.      15 hours spent researching other suppliers

c.       2.5 hours hearing about new company “green” initiatives

d.      24 hours negotiating final versions of updated contracts

5.      Additional Information Collected

a.      Green Initiatives from Suppliers

6.     Amount of time spent communicating with suppliers

a.      18 hours

7.     Number of Bids and Changes

a.      Average of 3 bids each – 10 total bids and changes

8.     Savings Achieved

a.      3% plus average of 8-12% predicted future increases

9.     Terms

a.      Net 30

10.  Contract Length

a.      Two year contract with reviews against Indexes every 6 months

11.   Number of additional suppliers supplying outlying divisions

a.      9 Suppliers representing 11 divisions – These agreements were not included in the project scope

12.   Project Complete Date

a.      March 6, 2013 last contract was finalized

Ray’s goals were focused solely on getting a reduction in pricing from his three major incumbents and as a side objective, understanding some of the “green” options and initiatives that they were either currently offered or would be offered in the near future.  While it could be argued that Ray achieved his goals, the case could also be made that the expectations he set and results of this project could have been much greater and could have resulted in additional value to his company.

Stay tuned tomorrow as the story of Ray and John concludes and we review the results John was able to achieve with his efforts.

You may be like Ray but desperately want to operate like John but without the staff or the time to dedicate at that level.

At SafeSourcing we understand Ray’s frustration and that is why our customer services team works with you to achieve great results while removing much of the work from your plate.  For more information on how we can help you with your sourcing projects, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today

We look forward to your comments.

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Taking the proper time in order to prepare for your sourcing projects. The story of Ray and John Part III

Monday, November 9th, 2015

 

Today’s post is our SafeSourcing Archives.

This week we are taking a look at how two procurement professionals approached the same containerboard project within their respective company.  Ray and John took different approaches to understanding the containerboard market and the sources of supply, and are now prepared to start looking at their changing company landscapes.

Ray is part of a very small procurement team and as a result he does not have nearly enough time to touch all of the areas within the sourcing process.  Ray also doesn’t have a lot of extra time in order to keep informed of the constant changes that are affecting his and other businesses all over the world.  Because Ray is not well-connected with other internal teams, there are new corporate initiatives being put into place in the form of new policies and programs that he is unaware of.  These programs could affect decisions he makes to source any number of products and services, especially in an area like containerboard.

Ray plans to source his containerboard from the same sources he has always used, and as an added step he will ask the vendors about any recycling programs they may have or that they are part of that his company may be able to use because his company had just had a ½ day event on how they could become better recyclers in the industry.

John’s team is not much bigger than Ray’s but he made a commitment long ago to have a monthly meeting or luncheon with the 12 department heads that he interfaces with. Four (4) of these have never run a project with John’s group before for but do have some opportunities they wish to explore.

When John last met with the HR department head he learned that the company recently received some bad press for not awarding some business to a company that was female-owned.  While the award was completely legitimate and the best company was awarded the business, it did bring up his company’s track record of working with minority-owned businesses.  In speaking with the HR director a new process was developed to collect information about the characteristics of the suppliers being considered in John’s projects so that the decision makers could have additional insight when making final award decisions.

When John met with the Environmental Program Director he was able to learn the breadth of his company’s new green initiatives, their new specifications on recycled product use and the programs they were trying to implement.  John was able to use all of this information in order to refine his containerboard specifications as well as the Terms and Conditions for this.

John also had a regular monthly meeting with the construction department head.  Three months ago he learned that his company was building two new warehouses on the east and west coast in order to handle overflow and distribution within the divisions.  John was curious and asked about the already spoken for capacity of the warehouses and was pleased to find out that they had each reserved space for potential projects that involved purchasing higher volumes in order to get reduced prices on some materials and product.  By becoming their own distributor, John planned to structure his project for containerboard in a way that gave him leverage to try and drive better pricing and create a flow of containerboard from the warehouses to divisions that were already getting scheduled loads.  This process also meant that we would be able to better control freight costs as the number and frequency of his containerboard deliveries from the suppliers could be reduced.

John now had a good feel for the market, suppliers and what his company was doing in other areas that allowed him to begin taking the next step of designing the goals he wanted to achieve through this process.

Stay tuned the rest of the week as the story of Ray and John unfolds.  You may be like Ray but desperately want to operate like John but without the staff or the time to dedicate at that level.

At SafeSourcing we understand Ray’s frustration and that is why our customer services team works with you to achieve great results while removing much of the work from your plate.  For more information on how we can help you with your sourcing projects, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today

We look forward to your comments.

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Taking the proper time to prepare for your sourcing projects. The story of Ray and John Part II

Friday, November 6th, 2015

 

Today’s post is our  SafeSourcing Archives.

In part one of this week’s post we began taking a look at how two procurement professionals approached the same containerboard project with their respective company.  Ray and John took different approaches to understanding the containerboard market and were now prepared to start looking at their supplier base.

Ray had been doing business with a few of his containerboard suppliers for a long time.  They were great people that were friendly and assured him at all times that they were doing everything they could to make sure he got the best price.  They were responsive to his needs and their track record for quality and delivery was pretty good as far as Ray had heard throughout the divisions.  There were, however, about 25% of the divisions that, due to acquisition or an allowance to be independent by the corporate office, had chosen other regional suppliers for their containerboard needs.  This 25% represented almost 40% of Rays overall spend.

Because Ray didn’t have the time to chase down all of the different suppliers being used by the acquired divisions and potentially disrupt his business  with potential vendor changes, he chose to focus on his existing vendor relationships and let the outlying divisions continue with business as usual.  Ray never had the time to really explore the mergers, partnerships and new companies that had developed since his last contracts were negotiated so, as many procurement professionals, he didn’t know what he didn’t know.

John too had been stuck in a place with a few primary suppliers and large number of regional vendors to supply his needs.  Because his automated contract management system had alerted him 120 days before the contracts were set to expire, he was able to send out an internal survey to the divisions  in order to ask them a few  detailed questions about their pricing, quality and relationship with the vendors that supplied their containerboard.

What he was able to learn through this process was very interesting.  Of the 24 divisions not being supplied by a major vendor, over half wanted to be supported by a national provider with better delivery performance.  He also learned that 2 of his regional suppliers had been acquired by one of his national vendors but had left the existing, higher priced agreement in place for those divisions.

Also through the course of sending out this survey, John was able to learn about a very large regional mill in the Midwest who traditionally had been primarily a newsprint manufacturer, but because of the decrease in printed media and the increase in the need for containerboard, had converted over 45% of their manufacturing capabilities to producing containerboard thereby increasing the competition in that area of the country where coincidently several of his company’s divisions were located.

The final issue John was able to learn upon  follow-up from a few surveys that  contained negative comments, was that the quality of one of his major National suppliers was beginning to suffer.  When he asked the division presidents why they had not mentioned this before, they all said that it was more of a nuisance than it was a real problem and that while it had been getting worse, it was not preventing them from hitting their numbers.

Armed with this information John had a complete picture of his current National and Regional supplier landscape as well as information relative to a few new suppliers that he had not known of with which to prepare for his sourcing project.  He know had what he needed to begin reaching out internally for how far he could go to make the changes that would benefit his company the most.

Stay tuned this week as the story of Ray and John unfolds.  You may be like Ray but desperately want to operate like John but without the staff or the time to dedicate for that level of performance.

At SafeSourcing we understand Ray’s frustration and that is why our customer services team works with you to achieve great results while removing much of the work from your plate.  For more information on how we can help you with your sourcing projects, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.  We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to your comments.

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Shame rolls downhill

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

 

Today’s post is by Michael Figueroa, Project Manager at SafeSourcing

What motivates us at work? What is your default mechanism for convincing others to do what you need them to do? When we use statements designed to get others to do something using their desire to protect their pride, we are inadvertently using the tool of threatening scarcity as motivation. Brene Brown uses the term “scarcity” to describe a system of incentives revolving around a message of “never enough”. In the example of pride, we often send the message of “I’m questioning whether or not you’re good enough to accomplish X”, as a reverse psychological means to allow someone to “prove us wrong”. In her phenomenal book “Daring Greatly”, Brene Brown identifies shame as the underlying concept of using scarcity to threaten into action. Brown defines shame as “the fear of not being worthy of connection.” The problem with shame in the workplace, however, is that it’s a short-term boost to motivation through a desire to survive.

When people only care about career survival, they don’t care about the success of their company. Shame motivates us to manage our appearance more than our performance. The results of shame motivation manifests itself in cutting others down or cutting corners to look competent, which usually produces results less than our best, and sabotages the appearances of others who may be talented but don’t know how to defend themselves. A staff spending all its time on defending itself is more talk than productivity. How does this play out in real life? Here are a few typical objectives found in the workplace, and the means by which we traditionally may try to accomplish them:

Objective: Get someone to…                    Means: Give the message:

-Work Harder                                                    – “Look how much harder your colleagues work”

-Fix a report                                                       – “Your communication skills aren’t good enough”

-Stay late                                                             – “If you don’t stay, you’re not a team player”

-Fix your mistake                                             – “You should have caught my mistake” (Blame Shift)

All of the examples on the right put us into defensive mode and therefore perception management modes. But how can we use the opportunities provided by the objectives to align the organization’s success with the individual’s output? We provide opportunities for increased connection, rather than threats to that connection. If shame is the fear of loss of connection, vulnerability is the tug we feel to support that connection.

No courage without vulnerability

If you make yourself invincible, never put yourself at risk for the sake of others, or are the type of person to run in the opposite direction when they see someone in danger, would anyone call you courageous? Courage forces us to put skin in the game. Skin in the game builds trust, and trust is a requirement for genuine human connection. When we see someone genuinely admitting that they need us, we dearly want to show them they can count on us. When someone shares a lifelong dream, we want to help them achieve it. These things require vulnerability, which is an invitation to connection, and in the workplace can be the key to motivating others to share in your vision.

Let’s look at the example from earlier. How might our approach change if we attempted motivation through connection, by being vulnerable?

Objective: Get someone to…                    ALTERNATE Means: Give the message:

-Work Harder                                                    – “I’m exhausted, can you take X off my plate?”

-Fix a report                                                       – “I need your skills here, will you make this look good?”

-Stay late                                                             – “We can’t do this alone, will you help us?”

-Fix your mistake                                             – “I messed up, will you help me recover?”

When we allow ourselves to be vulnerable we invite connection, and bring others onboard with our vision, which leads to investing into each other’s success and the success of the company. It’s not without some short term risk, by those who may want to take advantage of our personal vulnerability, but it can prevent a team from becoming disinterested in the organization’s long term success.

For more information on how SafeSourcing can assist your team with this process or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative. We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

We look forward to and appreciate your comments.

 

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Here’s how to Save Money on Your Company’s Armored Car Service

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

 

Today’s blog has been written by Ryan Melowic, Vice President of Customer Services at SafeSourcing.

Here’s the information that SafeSourcing would need in order to build and execute an RFQ (Request for Quote) for Armored Car Services that will save your company money.

If your company has a goal to reduce costs for its armored car services, SafeSourcing can help you. By gathering the information listed below and contacting SafeSourcing, we will work with you to meet and exceed your goal.

  1. Pickup location addresses for the bank deposits.
  2. Current frequencies for armored car pick-ups.
  3. The average amount of currency picked up by the armored car at each location.
  4. Details on any additional current or future services your company requires from your armored car service provider.
  5. Location addresses that bank deposits are being delivered to currently.
  6.  Information on what your business is spending for armored car services.

SafeSourcing will work with you and your company’s team to create RFQ collateral to go strategically to market with your business’s armored car service requirements in as little as a few weeks. The current average savings estimate for this category is 19%.

For more information on how SafeSourcing can help you with all your companies procurement needs, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative.

We look forward to and appreciate your comments!

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