Social Skills of Emotional Intelligence in Your Business

August 30th, 2016

This is the eight and final blog within the author’s series of Emotional Intelligence in Business...

 

Today’s post is written by Heather Powell, Director of Customer Service & Project Manager at SafeSourcing Inc.

This is the eighth blog within the author’s series of Emotional Intelligence in Business explaining social skills and how it will affect and help your business. Despite a bevy of research and best-selling books on the topic, many managers still downplay emotional intelligence as a “touchy-feely” soft skill1. The importance of characteristics like empathy and self-awareness is understood, sure, but intelligence and technical capability are seen as the real drivers of professional success1. Evidence suggests quite the opposite: that high emotional intelligence (EI) is a stronger predictor of a success1. In fact, high EI bolsters the hard skills, helping us think more creatively about how best to leverage our technical chops. 1.

5). Social Skills. Proficiency in managing relationships and building networks, and an ability to find common ground and build rapport.

a.) Hallmarks of social skills include effectiveness in leading change, persuasiveness, and expertise building and leading teams 3.

Social competence takes many forms – it’s more than just being chatty. These abilities range from being able to tune into another person’s feelings and understand how they think about things, to being a great collaborator and team player, to expertise at negotiation. All these skills are learned in life. We can improve on any of them we care about, but it takes time, effort, and perseverance. It helps to have a model, someone who embodies the skill we want to improve. But we also need to practice whenever a naturally occurring opportunity arises – and it may be listening to a teenager, not just a moment at work 4.

Identify and deal with your emotions: Whenever you have an argument with someone else, things can get heated. If someone involved is emotionally worked up, deal with that problem first. Take time apart to vent, blow off steam on your own, then return to the problem. In a work environment, this may just mean complaining to a friend before you email your boss back. In a romantic relationship, remind your partner that you care about them before criticizing. 6

Address legitimate problems once you’re both calm: Once you’re in your right headspace, identify what the conflict is. Before you jump to solutions, make sure you and the other person agree on what the problems really are. Propose solutions that are mutually beneficial and be sympathetic to any concessions the other person may be unwilling to make (but be sure to stand firm on your own).6

End on a cooperative note: Whether in business or pleasure, relationships work best when everyone involved knows that they’re on the same page. Even if you can’t end on a positive note, make sure that the last intention you communicate is a cooperative one. Let your boss/coworker/significant other know that you want to work towards the same goal, even if you have different views.6

Social skills are where good emotional intelligence is perhaps most obvious.

However, emotional intelligence does not start or end with social skills. Instead, it is a cycle, with its core lying with and in the individual. Only those who understand and regulate themselves and their emotions are able to work well and effectively with others. Understanding this is crucial to developing your emotional intelligence.5.

We enjoy bringing this blog to you and hope you find value in it. For more information on how we can help you with your procurement needs or on our “Risk Free” trial program, please contact a SafeSourcing Customer Service Representative. We have an entire customer services team waiting to assist you today.

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References:

1.http://www.dce.harvard.edu/professional/blog/emotional-intelligence-no-soft-skill

2.http://cultureofempathy.com/references/Experts/Daniel-Goleman.htm

3.https://www.sonoma.edu/users/s/swijtink/teaching/philosophy_101/paper1/goleman.htm

4. http://www.danielgoleman.info/social-skills-and-eq/

5. http://www.skillsyouneed.com/ips/social-skills-emotional-intelligence.html#ixzz4HQ2pLRR6

6. http://lifehacker.com/emotional-intelligence-the-social-skills-you-werent-ta-1697704987

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